Linux Delta
openSuse

openSuse

openSUSE, formerly SUSE Linux and SuSE Linux Professional, is a Linux distribution sponsored by SUSE Linux GmbH and other companies. It is widely used throughout the world. The focus of its development is creating usable open-source tools for software developers and system administrators, while providing a user-friendly desktop and feature-rich server environment. The initial release of the community project was a beta version of SUSE Linux 10.0. The current stable release is openSUSE Leap 15.0. The community project offers a rolling release version called openSUSE Tumbleweed, which is continuously updated with tested, stable packages. This is based on the rolling development code base called "Factory". Other tools and applications associated with the openSUSE project are YaST, Open Build Service, openQA, Snapper, Machinery, Portus and Kiwi. Novell created openSUSE after purchasing SuSE Linux AG for US$210 million on 4 November 2003. The Attachmate Group acquired Novell and split Novell and SUSE into two autonomous subsidiary companies. After The Attachmate Group merged with Micro Focus in November 2014, SUSE became its own business unit. On 4 July 2018, EQT Partners purchased SUSE for 2.5 billion USD.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenSUSE
Homepage: https://www.opensuse.org/

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1 users found this useful.
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AJUK

7 users found this useful.
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7 users found this useful.
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Richard

4 users found this useful.
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I've been using OpenSuse since 2007 through several hardware changes and only found unsolvable problems two times, one of which was hardware related. It's a true all-terrain distro... works no matter what you throw in, stable, trustworthy and easy to use.

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dun10p

9 users found this useful.
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I have been using opensuse tumbleweed on laptop and desktop for about 2 years. Other distros I've used in the past are ubuntu, fedora (around fedora 27), debian, and manjaro. I love the design of this distro and the ease with which you can transform the design using desktop themes. The ability to snapshot using btrfs is built right in. In fact, every time you update packages using zypper on tumbleweed, it takes a snapshot. If the upgrade was unsuccessful, it's super easy to boot from the preupgrade snapshot: it's literally just going to advanced options in the grub menu and selecting the old snapshot to boot from. Then, you can change the snapshot from read only to read write in a snap. Zypper is a nice package manager to use, seems fairly fast and adding additional repos is a breeze using yast. I have had two issues with tumbleweed so far: the first is that sleeping on my ryzen laptop works about half the time. This is a tumbleweed specific issue because the kernel is very recent and there's some bugs with acpi on ryzen in the very newest kernels. This is a minor issue though since opensuse saves sessions automatically and can restart my session. So even if sleep doesn't work and the laptop shuts off instead, it's only an extra second or two and I'm back where I was. The other thing is that, if the upgrade path requires some input: e.g. if package x has no new version but package y refers to a new version, the output is a bit too verbose. I feel like it would be confusing for some newer users. Typically, these sorts of conflicts can just be resolved by selecting the option to switch providers (e.g. if some package is updated in packman but not in the main repos) or by keeping an "obsolete" version (usually a non-obsolete version comes along in a couple days). My server rating should perhaps be taken with a grain of salt. I have only used opensuse (leap) in a server setting as an lxd container. However, I liked it pretty well. The main things I found better on the server side was easier network setup. At least for me, I find netplan on ubuntu kind of confusing. Probably just because it's new to me. I could see the ease of snapshot use thing being important for servers using opensuse in a vm or on bare metal. However, I just used the snapshotting features of lxd.

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13 users found this useful.
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29 users found this useful.
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openSUSE produces excellent projects! Leap is the stable distro that is the same code used in SUSE Linux Enterprise, Tumbleweed is the rolling snapshot release, Kubic is Certified Kubernetes distribution for container management. All three distros share the same common automated quality assurance (openQA) along with essentially the same code base and work flows. There are no Leap/Tumbleweed 'flavors' like Ubuntu - each Desktop Environment is maintained and is selectable in the advanced YaST install and Linux management tool. Snapshots are phenomenal and are built automatically after updates - Ubuntu is just now getting this feature in 20 04.

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26 users found this useful.
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Knightron

24 users found this useful.
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I tried openSUSE for several years unwilling to commit. Wanting a long lifespan distro i found myself leaving openSUSE for Slackware and Debian, but those two distros although splendid had other things that bothered me about them. When openSUSE 42.1 was released, incorporating the LEAP system, I adopted openSUSE permanently. 42.2 was better, and 42.3 was incredible. 15 and 15.1 have been fairly on par and slighty below 42.3 in quality in my opinion but still great. I like a stable system that doesn't flood me with updates. I want it to also offer some level of automation while staying out of my way at other times. This is a fine line that's hard to reach. Previous distros i've used like Slackware stay out of my way while others like Debian offer automation that eventually does get in the way. OpenSUSE manages to tread that fine line and i really like that. OpenSUSE isn't perfect though; although i like how openSUSE handles packages, i don't like the way it organises them. It's updates are a little more regular than Debian's or Slackware's too. The whole spelling plus the spelling history and now a potential name change again is a complete joke too, if they spelled the company name abiding by normal punctuation to begin with then they wouldn't be in this situation, but no messing it up once wasn't enough, they had to do it several times. I think the deficiencies existing in openSUSE are a small price to pay when considering the complete package that you get. After analysing these things personally among several distributions, i've come to conclusion that openSUSE is the most suited distribution for me and i believe it would make an exception desktop operating system for many other people too. I highly recommend it.

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Emanuele

30 users found this useful.
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776/5000 I am a longtime Ubuntu user, I decided to try openSUSE on the notebook for the integration that it has with Btrfs (except snapper that does too many snapshots, I wish I could decide whether to make daily snapshots, at boot, with zypper, what that I do with the Timeshift tool). Already starting with the installation, yast (many settings duplicated even with DE) and too many options that can cause chaos to a new user, no desktop customization to facilitate the user desktop: no clicks and install drivers or codecs (Ubuntu has a tool to search and install drivers, NVIDIA and wifi, without having to add repositories etc) etc etc I understand, unfortunately, because Ubuntu on the desktop is much more used. But for an experienced user, openSUSE is excellent.

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Tobias Görgens

26 users found this useful.
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36 users found this useful.
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Super stable and has all I need.

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Ryan

41 users found this useful.
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Haven't used this for a few years, but I never really understood why I would choose OpenSUSE over say Fedora. I found Yast annoying, I found packages were not always kept up to date, and I didn't really like the implementation of KDE or the icons used by the project. It seemed passable as a desktop OS, but I was not overly impressed by it. Another drawback in my opinion is the corporate ownership of SUSE itself, sure this isn't supposed to impact the community but who knows how it will play out in the long term...

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Howard

36 users found this useful.
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Been using this distro since the SuSE days over 20 years ago. Tried Ubuntu, Mint, and Mandriva, but much prefer openSUSE. I like KDE, and its Dolphin file manager is the best I've found. YaST is the best system manager around. openSUSE is rigorous about copyrights and proprietary software, so some extra steps are needed to set up multimedia. (There are excellent guides on doing it.) openSUSE forum is active and knowledgeable.

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Sven

41 users found this useful.
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This has been rock-solid for me for several years. As it should be since SUSE, tumbleweed and Leap have an intertwined cycle of testing that sends fixes upstream and downstream. nVidia drivers are in the repo and once I sorted out which number was to be installed everything has been great graphically. Initial install was more complicated than some other distros and the amount of tools in YAST2 was overwhelming at first, but once you get used to it it makes some of the other distros seem like they lack something.

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38 users found this useful.
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Timothy

47 users found this useful.
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For a rolling distro, Tumbleweed is remarkably stable.

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41 users found this useful.
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openSUSE Leap has been rock solid for me since long before it was called Leap. I occasionally use other distributions, e.g. when the user knows or the application supports only a specific distro, but when given a choice I prefer the security and reliability of openSUSE.

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Fnatic

48 users found this useful.
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After distro-hopping for about 2 years, I've finally settled on openSUSE Tumbleweed with KDE. The only issue I had is setting up my VPN because you don't need to dw the VPN's app since you can configure it trough Yast. "issue"...

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Stanley

57 users found this useful.
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A throwback to how distros used to be 15 years or more ago. Nothing remarkable, no vision for the future. Objectively the slowest distro from the major vendors.

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Bob

50 users found this useful.
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OpenSuse Leap 15.1 with KDE Plasma 15.12 runs in 400M of ram. Wow. Super stable and professional looking with the awesome YAST configuration utility. The BTRFS partition gives you the ability to snapshot the system.

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63 users found this useful.
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Tim

65 users found this useful.
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I moved from debian, which I'd been using for 15 years, to opensuse tumbleweed about a year ago and I've been very impressed with how opensuse tumbleweed manages to maintain a stable but bleeding edge distro. The kde integration is unmatched by any other distro that I've tried. I don't run a server nor do I have any IoT devices so I can only comment on the desktop, which is superb.

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63 users found this useful.
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apd

65 users found this useful.
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76 users found this useful.
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<3

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60 users found this useful.
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Anatoli I

59 users found this useful.
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I've been using openSUSE as a main OS for the last almost 10 years and it is very stable, there are quite a lot of packages and mixing repos doesn't cause much troubles in the recent releases (in the 10 and 11 versions things could go wrong in some quite "interesting" ways :D). I gave it 8 stars for Server because I am mostly using it as a Desktop, have had a few servers in the past and all went well, though they were mostly on a Lab stage. Three stars for IoT because I haven't done anything of the sorts yet, but considering the number of ports it shouldn't be much of a headache, also I have read some positive feedback from people who are using openSUSE in IoT envs.

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David Field

56 users found this useful.
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I've used many many distros and now settled for Tumbleweed, it's awesome, good package management, DevOps support and just works

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57 users found this useful.
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<

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63 users found this useful.
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61 users found this useful.
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openSUSE is unquestionably one of the best and possibly the best engineered of linux distros. Tumbleweed delivers outstanding stability for a cutting edge rolling release, largely thanks to openSUSE's openQA automated testing technology. The fixed release Leap strikes the best balance of contemporary software with world class stability. Whether mobile or desktop client, headless server, embedded appliance, hypervisor, container host, SAN/NAS etc... openSUSE excels in any role. When I began using linux I tried many products, some of which I continue to use, but it was only after using openSUSE that I truly became a convert.

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Phil

75 users found this useful.
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Great, stable distribution with a lot of features (i.e. not one with a small footprint). Easy to manage by YaST, good integration of snapshots.

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59 users found this useful.
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trmdi

64 users found this useful.
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John Crist

68 users found this useful.
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Do you have work to do? I do. Gentoo user for over a decade, dabbled in Arch, but at the end of the day I'm an adult with tasks to complete, priorities to focus on, a wife and kids to feed, dogs to walk, and TV to watch. OpenSUSE ftw.

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59 users found this useful.
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58 users found this useful.
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Tony

58 users found this useful.
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Very good distro indeed, but not much as "rolling" release; It often happens that some packages do not receive updated versions or remain ignored for a long time, thing which does not happen with other rolling distros such as Arch, and also those that focus more on stability like Debian Sid...

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CubicleNate

52 users found this useful.
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I want to preface this with I think, for the most part, nearly all Linux is good Linux but my primary distribution of choice is openSUSE. If a piece of software isn't in the official openSUSE Software repository, there are experimental and community software repositories that likely have it. If none of those work, you have Flatpak, Snaps and AppImages that will work too. The two distributions of [open]SUSE I use is Tumbleweed and Leap. Tumbleweed is a very stable, rolling distribution of Linux. I use this on most of my systems. The software is up to date and has been run through the automated QA system called openQA so generally, the software you get is pretty well tested. Nothing is perfect of course. Leap is the more traditional, static distribution that has a version release about every 12 months. These releases also coincide with the enterprise offering from SUSE called SLE (SUSE Linux Enterprise). They share the same core, such as the kernel but have more updated packages and the openSUSE Community's efforts placed on top of it. It should be noted that the kernel versions may look a bit dated but they do have hardware enablement backported from the newer kernel. I am very pragmatic in my computer usage. A computer is a tool that helps me get work done, I want my computer to work for me, I don't want to work for my computer. I also make mistakes as sometimes I do like to fiddle and play with computers. After all, computers SHOULD be fun. The great thing about openSUSE is that it is VERY fault tolerant. Should my messing about break something, I can boot into a previous snapshot, (assuming you set it up as such), wipe out the mistakes I made and keep chugging along. No need for a "nuke and pave". Tumbleweed is a great distribution as it is rolling and very tolerant to not being updated frequently. You can update as often as you would like or put off updates for weeks, even several months (although not recommended). Even after neglecting updates, perform the update (sudo zypper dup) and it will update just as cleanly as if you had followed every snapshot. Regardless of the technology openSUSE sits upon, with all the tooling (Open Build Service, openQA, Kiwi, wiki etc), the part of the distribution that I appreciate the most is the community of users. It is simply a fantastic and helpful community of people. Sure, some people may have an 'off day' and something might not come across the screen in the best light but for the vast majority of the users and members of the project, it is filled with great, great people. openSUSE has a very welcoming culture and if you have an idea and want to do a thing with openSUSE, all the tools, the hosting infrastructure and documentation to support it are all there, ready for you to make it happen. Should you have some non-traditional applications (RaspberryPi, Pine64, BeagleBone, etc), openSUSE will likely work for you too. Sometimes the images available may not fit your requirements, should this be your case the tools are there to customize it and optionally have openSUSE host it for you. There are a whole host of other reasons that I make openSUSE my home Linux distro but chances are, you stopped reading three paragraphs ago. openSUSE can be as feature rich or pared down as you want for your particular project. It's really a fantastic, forward leaning, project.

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65 users found this useful.
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56 users found this useful.
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It just werks. And when it doesn't you just rollback a snapshot. It feels a bit slow though, I would say due to btrfs and all the CoW it does. Overall, I'd give it a perfect score of 5/7.

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50 users found this useful.
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52 users found this useful.
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Adi

58 users found this useful.
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happy desktop user since suse 11.kde plasma integration out performs windows/osx, for developer a perfect out of the box,docker/virtualizations..

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59 users found this useful.
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corby

58 users found this useful.
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I have used Ubuntu/Debian almost exclusively in the past. I have been running tumbleweed for a couple of months and could not be happier. Everything just works. Wine, Steam, even Snapd. There is a mythology of trouble with tumbleweed but I have had zero issues. Could not be happier. Cannot comment on server or IoT

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57 users found this useful.
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42 users found this useful.
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beef

42 users found this useful.
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maceion

37 users found this useful.
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I have used openSUSE since SuSE version 8 as a 'standby' system due to Windows problems. In last 3 years I now use openSUSE (XFCE desktop & KDE desktop) as my main system, and on about 4 machines of my own and two of relatives I support. However to be able to view news videos on www.BBC.co.uk/news I also add the Packman repository at priority 90, so video related and codec related programs get the Packman version.

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Petrov

40 users found this useful.
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I've only used as a desktop env

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37 users found this useful.
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38 users found this useful.
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BTWarch

30 users found this useful.
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Tumbleweed is rock solid on the desktop (as long as you update as per given instructions). I went for XFCE variant as is my custom and have liked it very much. For some reason this isn't the best for gaming: many Steam games (native and Proton) require tinkering, which I haven't needed to do on other distros. In case it is of importance; I'm on AMD graphics.

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robhwill

38 users found this useful.
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Stable, reliable distro with very active & helpful community (forums, etc.). Excellent for business, personal or development usage. Respected worldwide!

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Jan

25 users found this useful.
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I use tumbleweed. Great rolling distribution. Feels and works like every other point Release distribution. But all software is on the newest version. Yast is a great tool to change nearly every systemsetting, install software, etc. If an update should break the System, you can use snapper to restore a previous state of the system.

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Paul

48 users found this useful.
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I was on Tumbleweed with default BTRFS. When leaving the computer for a long time, like listening to a long video (like Destination Linux), it would play fine, but would become not responsive for about 5 mins when trying to do something else. During this time, a top windows would show the process at about 98% IO waiting, and slowly going down toward about 2%. I can't believe I tolerated this about 1 month! This week I have tried Debian 10 and seen it was going very well (about 1% or 2% IO waiting in general). So I decided to reinstall OpenSuse TumbleWeed, but specify to make a EXT4 partition rather than BTRFS. It is now working almost as good as Debian 10.

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Ed

31 users found this useful.
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Once great Distro, no marred by stupid dumb software installs. Wanted to install Git, it told me that it will break five other packages.. wot? Paying Microshite for those certificates really hurt development as it seems to not be focussed on desktop any more, and I want on my desktop what I have on my server. Doesn't feel newbie friendly and it's those people you want as they will be the next generation of Suse users, Neckbeards will be gone soon.

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31 users found this useful.
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Sorry about this, but when software from you default repos installs but does not work correctly its a failure in my book. I dont know what happened to the newest version, the older version was not so bad. But you can try it for yourself, install it and Blender 3d. The test on the menus is missing so program is useless and have had others verify that. Also not a fan of the Graphical YAST.

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ZebedeeBoss

28 users found this useful.
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openSuse Tumbleweed on KDE. Simply Beautiful. It just works. Updates are simple and reliable. Software choice is good and good guides/support can be found around the web for any problems you may encounter.

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tiny6996

37 users found this useful.
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was the most stable rolling distro I ever used. Yast was a great gui tool for managing the system. The default repositories have a ton of software. The btrfs snapshots are nice to have out of the box and the installer allows you preinstall your GUI of choice and add some dev tools

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Nick

34 users found this useful.
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I've become a bit enamored with openSUSE to the point where I won't really run much of anything else. The community is extremely helpful and friendly, but you can tell many of them are there to both tinker and actually use their machines to get some work done. It's hard to find that balance in some communities. It's a distribution with a corporate backing, but the company itself is pretty FOSS friendly and does a great deal for the Linux community. Their own community has a great deal of say in how openSUSE operates. You'll even hear the chairman (appointed by SUSE), Richard Brown, explain that openSUSE often finds its direction somewhat organically (I believe he's described it as semi-anarchy at times) via those who are working on the project, with the board (elected by the community) having some final say if things get out of hand, of course. There are two primary types that you'll likely care about: 1. openSUSE Leap is their "stable" release with an 18 month lifecycle. Upgrading is usually very simple and painless when the time comes. Interestingly, you can upgrade to or from SLE (SUSE Linux Enterprise - i.e. their pay-for-support-in-an-enterprise-environment) without many issues (they'll warn you might need to spend some time messing with some dependency issues, but I haven't had any issues that took longer than a few minutes to address). It's as solid as any "stable" release is these days; no complaints, overall. 2. openSUSE Tumbleweed is their "rolling" release (comparable to something like Arch). This is what really won me over. It's an amazingly stable rolling release that goes through an extremely impressive array of tests (many of them automated) to ensure it works. Their track record has been truly extraordinary, and at times they are more bleeding edge than Arch with certain packages, if that's your thing. The way they're doing their upgrades is just plain neat since you're actually upgrading to newer snapshots that have their own versions of each repository, etc. Feature Highlights: 1. Btrfs. I never really paid much attention to my file system. Sure, eventually I learned about ZFS due to my job and found myself oddly affectionate about a file system, but I typically just stuck with good ol' ext for my desktop/laptop. This all changed with btrfs. You will see some go on about its alleged issues. But understand that many of these reported issues occurred in its infancy and many more were a result of people misunderstanding how to troubleshoot disk errors (there are some assumptions out there about steps to take because they work in most file systems...except ZFS and btrfs). I've had zero issues and its features have won me over (more on that later). 2. Snapper is where things get interesting for Tumbleweed and further illuminates what's great about btrfs. Snapper automatically creates btrfs snapshots of your system every time you do anything that's potentially damaging. For instance, every single time you run an install/update/upgrade/remove command with zypper (or with the GUI package manager), Snapper automatically creates a new btrfs snapshot. This means that if it completely borks your system, you can reboot into the old snapshot as if nothing happened. I've tested this several times on various machines (including some rather large servers) and its worked flawlessly. In all reality, Snapper is just something that's managing btrfs snapshots for you automatically along with providing a more user-friendly CLI, but it's great nonetheless. 3. Yast is openSUSE's all-in-one management tool. You can manage everything about your machine from Yast. There's some hate out there on the internet with some more experienced Linux users towards Yast. I'm not really sure why, though I suspect it may have something to do with an older version (it has since been rewritten in Ruby). You can almost completely ignore Yast if you choose, but frankly, it's an extremely powerful and helpful tool - I'm not even sure where I'd start. 4. I've never cared about package managers. But man, something about zypper is just really polished. It's much easier to understand what's going on (especially compared to apt), its commands are intuitive, complex repository management is clear and easy to use, documentation is solid, and I've had no issues with managing dependencies. I'm not going to say I'm a zypper fanatic, but after using zypper I started to wonder why other package managers weren't better than they are for the first time. 5. openSUSE's Build Service (OBS) is basically a more refined, better managed, and better tested AUR. Some Minor Quirks: 1. WiFi can be weird at first. It took me some time to realize Yast uses "wicked" by default. You'll want to tell Yast to use NetworkManager if you prefer. Depending on your desktop environment, you may not encounter this issue. 2. Fonts can be a problem. I didn't have this issue during my first couple of installs, but I must have done something differently later down the road. I've encountered some frustrating font issues (basically openSUSE *seems* to ignore your font settings and it just looks generally awful). Solution that worked for me: >> Go here and install True Type: https://en.opensuse.org/SDB:TrueType >> Have Yast manage your fonts (already installed on Leap): https://software.opensuse.org/package/yast2-fonts?search_term=yast2-fonts 3. Sometimes you'll have some issues finding packages that may be more common in Debian-based distributions or the AUR for you Arch users. I've learned that *most* of the time you can simply grab the rpm for Fedora/RHEL - if available - and have Yast install it for you. Or, the preferred option, is to simply take a look at openSUSE's Build Service (OBS) - there's a good chance you'll find what you're looking for. 4. Their firewall settings are far more secure by default than many distributions I've worked with in the past (with the exception of CentOS and RHEL). If you plan to install this on a server, you may need to tinker with the firewall settings to open ports, etc. It's not difficult and it's all pretty intuitive, but it can still be tedious at times. 5. Be sure to add the packman (not pacman) repository. You'll need it for codecs and the like. This is an absolute must that many don't realize at first when they're new. A quick Google search will get you there; it's not difficult by any means. Machines I've Used: 1. Thinkpad T450 (my main driver that I use for work every day) - Tumbleweed - No issues 2. Thinkpad X230 (something of a back up of mine) - Tumbleweed - No issues 3. Thinkpad W530 - Tumbleweed - Some annoyances with getting NVIDIA Optimus working correctly, but I always have that issue no matter the distribution 3. Custom built Desktop (Intel i7 8th gen, NVIDIA graphics, etc.) - Tumbleweed & Leap - No issues (this includes some gaming) 4. Dell PowerEdge R710s - Tumbleweed & Leap - No issues 5. Various Dell Desktops from corporate environments - Tumbleweed & Leap - No issues Final comments: As I mentioned, I use openSUSE Tumbleweed daily for work with no issues. I've used KDE Plasma (and it's so darn pretty), XFCE, IceWM (their minimal install other than no DE), and a bit of GNOME. They've all been fine with no issues. I've also used i3 and bspwm with no issues aside from the usual journey of getting your configuration in order. More recently, I've been using Sway (i3 port to Wayland) - the transition was incredibly smooth and painless. Overall, I'm quite happy with openSUSE, their distribution, their commitment to FOSS, and most of all, their community. I can't say it's perfect - I've definitely encountered a minor issue or two and bugs obviously *do* happen. But in the end, I can highly recommend this distribution. I know this is long, but hopefully someone finds it helpful.

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49 users found this useful.
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XFCE Leap 15.1. Works great.

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Keks Dose

41 users found this useful.
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Since nearly 20 years I'm using the Suse-distributions, now openSuse »Leap 15.1«. Very stable, easy to install, supports all the hardware in different notebooks. KDE is fun.

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Jared Komoroski

55 users found this useful.
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Running OpenSuse Tumbleweed has been excellent. Btrfs and snapper completely mitigate any risks that rolling release distros bring in.

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54 users found this useful.
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openSUSE is the only fully function linux distribution for the desktop providing all the tools needed to manage and deploy in the enterprise or small business or home. Its widespread use of its parent SUSE in the server market and its key partnerships shows the industry has already recognized its prowness as a server and for IoT. It's biggest flaw is that the developers don't blow their own horn. They need to improve their marketing!

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Mason Mullins

58 users found this useful.
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67 users found this useful.
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There are really two distros inside openSUSE: 1)Leap is the free long term support release that matches the commercial SLE cycle. You can purchase a commercial support for Leap and convert it to SLE very easily. 2) Tumbleweed is the rolling release from openSUSE (similar to Arch). Both are excellent distributions for server and desktop with fantastic tooling to help you get the job done and have fun.

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fleamour

54 users found this useful.
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Both Leap & Tumbleweed hibernate out the box, unlike Ubuntu which disables hibernation.

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56 users found this useful.
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Tumbleweed FTW

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60 users found this useful.
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grenangen

53 users found this useful.
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For me, the best and my goto distro.

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66 users found this useful.
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Useful

72 users found this useful.
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Oliver

57 users found this useful.
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Useful

57 users found this useful.
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Useful

58 users found this useful.
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Useful

51 users found this useful.
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Useful

59 users found this useful.
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Great balance between stability and modern packages.

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56 users found this useful.
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Tumbleweed... Its secure, quick, and trouble free and I dont have to worry about updating every so often, it just works! I've been very happy with it.

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67 users found this useful.
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Best Linux Distro i could find.

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58 users found this useful.
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