Linux Delta
Fedora

Fedora

Fedora is a Linux distribution developed by the community-supported Fedora Project and sponsored by Red Hat. Fedora contains software distributed under various free and open-source licenses and aims to be on the leading edge of such technologies. Fedora is the upstream source of the commercial Red Hat Enterprise Linux distribution. Since the release of Fedora 21, three different editions are currently available: Workstation, focused on the personal computer, Server for servers, and Atomic focused on cloud computing. As of February 2016, Fedora has an estimated 1.2 million users, including Linus Torvalds, creator of the Linux kernel.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fedora_(operating_system)
Homepage: https://getfedora.org/

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Ryan

1 users found this useful.
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I have used Fedora since before it was Fedora (e.g. I started getting hooked on Linux on RedHat 9). Fedora is a great desktop for getting the latest software without too many stability issues or bugs. It makes a really good development workstation base especially if you are working in a Redhat environment. Unlike Ubuntu, it doesn't hide the power of the operating system away from the user so it's a great desktop for anyone who is an intermediate to advanced Linux user. Newer Linux users may get frustrated by some buggy software occasionally and the 6 month release cycle. In the server space I am less certain about it's suitability because of the software bugs and rapid release cycle. Having not used the IoT version of Fedora I cannot comment on this particularly.

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Hammerhead Corvette

12 users found this useful.
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A cutting edge distro. 6 month release cycle with up to 13 month support for versions. Since Fedora 27 the system upgrade has been nearly seamless. On Fedora 30, with the rise of flatpaks it has brought a stability and ease of upgrades to the system. Fedora 30 also has a new spin called Silverblue which brings an atomic update model (immutable OS ) inherited from the CoreOS version for server and IoT. I have been on Fedora since F23 and have never looked back.

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Amit Rahat

12 users found this useful.
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I love Fedora because it combines all the things I love at Linux: stability, cutting edge, read for tinkering and beautiful. It's the best place to get acquainted with how the standards will be in a couple of years.

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Steve

10 users found this useful.
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I have been using Fedora for nearly 3 years, I am general very happy with it, I use gnome. its quick easy to navigate, it has good community that have helped me solve an issue or two. My pain point is the 6 month update. Every time I update. Even if I wait a month. My blue tooth mouse will just not work. I have to reload the laptop from scratch. Every... time..... my system= Lenovo X260 – razer orochi mouse

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18 users found this useful.
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j0ust

20 users found this useful.
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Truth be told, I love Fedora. When I can't get another distro up and running on certain hardware, Fedora always just works. While I get why, I wish they'd impliment gparted without the work arounds. Yes, parted does the same thing but sometimes I like a splash of color. Disks just doesn't give me that sda,sdb visualization bar I so very find atractive.

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Stanley

21 users found this useful.
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Meh. Don't believe the hype.

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21 users found this useful.
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29 users found this useful.
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23 users found this useful.
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malucious

26 users found this useful.
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Fedora is a great distro, but I'm going to start by listing what I feel is the biggest downside to running Fedora. It releases quickly (every 6 months), so support cycles are kinda short (13 months), which means you must upgrade often. For me it is not a problem (explained later), but it does make me hesitate to suggest it to others. Now the good stuff. Fedora is my favorite desktop distro. I love the up-to-date packages, the new kernels, and the Gnome implementation. I also love that between rpmfusion and the official repos, I can get nearly all the software I need. Gaming works great too (steam, proton, etc).Fedora upgrades are great, which is why I don't mind the short support cycles. I have done many upgrades on multiple systems with no issue. Fedora makes a great server if you need one with newer packages. The preinstalled Cockpit management interface is really nice. I have not tested Fedora in the IoT space.

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RetroMechanical

24 users found this useful.
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I started with Fedora back when it was called Fedora Core. With the exception of a few distro-hopping stents, Fedora has been my desktop go to. I have used it on my laptops and desktops and found its hardware support to be top notch. Its packages are updated at a rate that roughly matches my preferred pace - which is close to enough rolling, but with a little more testing. Because of Fedora's relationship with Red Hat, I trust the people behind the project to do what is right for security, the user, and the community. The default desktop is a clean and near-standard GNOME. Customizations through extensions are easy enough that I prefer to manage it myself rather than having the distro make the calls for me. For the sever, it works amazingly well. That said, I dropped two stars and don't use it on my servers because of the upgrade cycle. The one Fedora server I ran never bit me but the longer support period of CentOS or RedHat is really needed for most of my applications. The frequent updates I like on the Desktop are a bit of a problem for a server. I use it like a usable technology preview on the server.

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26 users found this useful.
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Chris Topher

25 users found this useful.
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I've never used Fedora for server or IoT. Fedora was my first Linux desktop and its a true hacker's system. Very transparent, feature-forward, configurable, with defaults sane for a power user. Fedora is excellent for developers and tinkerers due to its rapid adoption of new and experimental technology and configurability. It has a large repository of software in the default repos which is expanded by the copr repos and flatpack support. Snapd support requires you to turn off SELinux (or do a lot of experimental tinkering). The software curators are more conscientious than most distros and omit unmaintained, out-of-date, or insecure packages from the repo. This may be a shock switching from Ubuntu or the ilk when some software you're used to isn't included, however despite this, the repos rival the Debian repos in scale and you can feel confident in the software you find there. Furthermore, with the 6-month release cadence, you can always have tge latest software packages and kernels. Until recently, Fedora didn't strive to be especially non-free software friendly, but is making pragmatic strides. That said, most proprietary software seems to target Debian based distros and may be difficult to install when all they provide is a .deb package. The upgrade process has never been smooth for me, maybe because I hack around with my system, but I switched away after the 31 upgrade left me unbootable. But I'm always invariably drawn back by the urge to try something new that is difficult to do on any distros that's not Fedora.

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Alejandro

27 users found this useful.
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The default configuration of things like firewalld and SELinux (among other things) make a pretty secure system out-of-the-box, which is really appreciated when you're working with sensitive information. The avenues for contributing to the projects are fairly straight forward, which is great if you like to give back to the project and can't spare a lot of money. The upgrade process is usually painless and error free, which makes it a pseudo-rolling release. A lot of attention goes into making the system stable. It stays out of your way: exactly what you need to be productive at work. It's my daily driver at work. As a software developer, it's great to have the latest packages available and the Red Hat sponsorship means that a lot of enterprise resources are available for Fedora as well, so I'm rarely in need of tools that I can't get from Red Hat or the Fedora repos. It's also the OS of choice on my personal life. I've had only 2 issues that I wasn't able to solve, one of which was related to hardware failure and other that was because I changed something I shouldn't have. Fast, secure and it's probably going to be around a long time.

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CT

24 users found this useful.
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I love my Fedora desktop. :)

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inflatus

26 users found this useful.
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Fedora on the Desktop was easy to install and intuitive. Feel like new to Linux users could follow along fine. Installs the Gnome desktop which for me was perfect. Have used Gnome for years. Had used Ubuntu since 10.04. Am glad I made the switch to Fedora. Not had any issues with using this as my daily driver. Cheers.

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26 users found this useful.
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Mike

25 users found this useful.
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A perfect balance between LTS and Rolling Release.

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25 users found this useful.
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Missing sane defaults for repo selection. Needs to be upgraded after install.

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thebats

22 users found this useful.
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Fedora is my daily driver which not only gives me up to date packages but also stability. Fedora is like the best of both worlds. I would recommend Fedora to Linux users who have used linux for one or two years. It may not be as user friendly to novice users but it's definitely good for linux users with some experience. Fedora is the go to distro for developers. Its just perfect for developers.

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GotoLamia I

20 users found this useful.
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Been using this distro for a long time I love every version it is always solid for me.

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29 users found this useful.
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While I love Fedora, the reality is that its short support cycles make it less than ideal for real desktop and server work, including IOT. For production machines, one does not have the luxury of continuously updating. The technology and stability are great, but the lack of support after 9 mos precludes it from these markets for serious, mainstream work.

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21 users found this useful.
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What can i say other than i start using managing Red Hat server almost 15 years ago and switch every PC on my houses to Fedora a few years ago. My kids got used to it and they wouldnt switch back to windows! Thanks,

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Greggulus

27 users found this useful.
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Stable and up to date distribution with great software. Just in my experience it's better to install a Fedora spin instead of the one from the front page. google fedora spins and you should see the nice list of awesome de's.

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23 users found this useful.
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I was a Plasma user and didn’t enjoy Gnome until I used Fedora. It’s hard to say what it was about Fedora that made me love Gnome, but I love the stance on Free Software that Fedora has but also at the same time , makes it easy to get non-free software for those times you need or want it. I love the stable Desktop environment but fast updates on other apps and Utilities. I’ve been a happy Fedora user since version 26 and it cured my distro hoping . I haven’t used the IOT or server version.

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Daniel

24 users found this useful.
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A top-tier distro with an amazing level of polish. Everything just looks and feels great, even the boot screen. Only issue is Fedora doesn't guide your hand in installing things like nvidia drivers, codecs etc, but then these aren't very difficult and there's reasons behind it.

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29 users found this useful.
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If you are working with servers or you are going to - then you have to try it. You will get newer packages (compared to CentOS/RHEL) and learning the workflow you will need on the server. You will also get a taste of the features which are coming to the servers and will be used to them when they hit your server OS. As a side note - compared to other desktop distros you will get some goodness very soon - sometimes too early, which will lead to some glitches. As a server - again great to train with or just deploy newer packages more easily. IoT - it is going to get even easy to deploy Fedora on IoT infra I would say.

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22 users found this useful.
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Eric The IT Guy

39 users found this useful.
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While I love CentOS on the server, some of its core libraries are starting to show its age. That makes it harder for RHEL-based installations to keep up with our rapidly changing industry. Fedora has "spins" for Server, Desktop, and even IoT so you can work from the same tools and code base but have the instance optimized for your intended use. This is currently my go to for home use.

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27 users found this useful.
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Ryan Crowne

19 users found this useful.
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ihmy

30 users found this useful.
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Nice, fun and relatively user-friendly. However, the installer, partitioner and such things are not as polished as with Ubuntu or openSUSE. And that's a bad things since you might want to re-install it every six months, due to the poor upgrade experience.

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31 users found this useful.
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